Psychology of Colour

Ready for a Helix HQ interior revamp!? But not before we get our colour scheme just right! Colour is an extremely important and effective element in interior design. Colour has been proven to evoke specific physical and psychological responses within our bodies.

FARM, Hide & Seek, Singapore. each band of color is occupied by a different local designer label — reminiscent of a color-band that might show up if you forget to turn your TV off at night.

FARM, Hide & Seek, Singapore. Each band of colour is occupied by a different local designer label — reminiscent of a colour-band that might show up if you forget to turn your TV off at night.

Red is considered the ‘physical’ colour; it has the ability to raise our pulses and create the illusion that time is passing faster than it is. It is also said by colour psychologists that red induces appetite; this is directly related to the physical effect red has on our bodies. Blue, on the other hand, is known as the ‘intellectual’ colour; it tends to affect us mentally by stimulating thought, communication and concentration. Yellow is considered the ‘emotional’ colour; it can evoke optimism and confidence in certain hues, but anxiety and depression in others.

TWEET_04

The red shop frontage of The Tweet Shop, London, entices customers in for yummy Kellogg’s Cracker Crisps!

It is important that these factors be taken into consideration when designing the spaces that we live, work and play in.

Colour can be applied to surfaces or as light to create interested and dynamic spaces.

Colour can be applied to surfaces or as light to create interested and dynamic spaces.

Here are some of the basic rules:

1. Bright colors — that is, vibrant shades of green and blue, yellow, and orange — provide an expansive feeling. These are friendly, happy colors that encourage communication.

2. Dark colors, such as red, purple, blue, and dark shades of green, can have a constricting and gloomy effect. But when applied in the right place or as accent elements, they can help convey comfort and security.

3. Warm colors — orange and yellow hues, for example — raise the perceived temperature of a room. For that reason, they’re best used in rooms that face north. They inspire activity, avoid them in rooms meant for relaxation.

4. Cold colors, such as icy blues and green, have a calming effect. They help you feel relaxed and refreshed.
Psychology of colour wheel.

Psychology of colour wheel.

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3 thoughts on “Psychology of Colour

  1. Pingback: How Colour is Used in Product Design - Make your ideas Art

  2. Pingback: Why Do We Think Some Colours Clash And Others Match? - Make your ideas Art

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